The Blessings of Giving

How would you like to leave your legacy? This page provides information about how to write your will and more!

El Morya has requested that we all put our personal affairs in order.

Now is the time to invest in our spiritual cause that will bless lightbearers for generations.

El Morya gave a dispensation that anyone who wills 10% of the proceeds of their estate to The Hearts Center can attend three Hearts Center events free with waived registration fees.

Watch: El Morya's directives
Regarding wills

 

GETTING STARTED

  1. Determine your personal goals and outline your objectives, inventory your property and major assets, estimate any mortgages and personal debts, and prepare a list of family members and other beneficiaries to whom you choose to pass assets. You may also desire to ask yourself these two questions:

    • How will I divide my assets among my family members, other loved ones and favorite causes?
    • Do I have to make special provisions for any of my heirs? If so, what are they?

  2. If you have minor children or an adult child, a parent, or a spouse with special needs who is your dependent, you must think about who will care for them when you're gone. Choose a guardian and secondary guardian and do the necessary legal paperwork. Talk to the guardian(s) ahead of time about what you are asking, and understand that if you don't name a guardian, the courts may end up doing it for you.

  3. Choose a person you trust to be named as the executor (the person or institution that will carry out your instructions in your will). The Executor undertakes many important responsibilities, including:

    • Notifying all interested parties and agencies of your death.
    • Taking care of the disposition of your remains.
    • Performing the fiduciary responsibilities of your estate (paying bills, taxes, etc.).
    • Distributing your assets according to your will.
    • Working with the courts and attorneys to resolve any unsettled matters.

    *If you don't have a will, or if your will doesn't name an executor, the courts will appoint one. See How to safeguard your decision – choosing the right executor or trustee
  4. Terms Defined and Official Language to Use

    Choose what to give to The Hearts Center from the following options:

    • A general bequest gives us a stated sum of money. If there is insufficient cash in your estate to cover the bequest, other assets will be sold for cash to honor your wishes for us.
    • A specific bequest gives us a particular piece of property. Note: If you disposed of the property before your death, we won't receive your intended gift. A residuary bequest means giving the "rest, residue or remainder" of your estate, or, more commonly, a percentage of the residue after all other bequests, debts and taxes have been paid.
    • A contingent bequest requires a certain event to occur before the gift can happen. For example, you could bequeath funds to a family member provided that person survives you; if not, the funds would then go to The Hearts Center.

  5. You can tailor how you would like The Hearts Center to use your gift.

    • An unrestricted bequest allows us to use the assets in the most beneficial way.
    • A restricted bequest allows you to specify how we are to use the funds. Your funds could go to publishing books, supporting youth activities or expanding outreach. Contact us in advance to be certain your intent can be fulfilled.
    • An endowed bequest allows you to restrict the principal of your gift so we can use only a small portion each year, typically allowing the fund to last forever.

    The official bequest language for The Hearts Center is: I give ___________a (restricted, unrestricted or endowed) (residue, percentage, or specific amount) to The Hearts Center Inc., having its principle office at 130 N. 2nd Street, Livingston, MT, for the general purpose of sharing the ascended masters' love-wisdom teachings throughout the Earth.

  6. Meet with an Estate Planning Attorney. Seek the counsel of an estate planning attorney to achieve the highest outcome for your heirs and to help make your estate plans the best they can be. Even if you think your will requirements are simple, there are likely rules of construction and formalities required that are particular to your state. Make sure that your final documents are legally valid and executable. Also consider where you will keep the documents safely so that they will be readily available, and make sure your heirs and executor know where to locate them. They can also be placed in safe deposit boxes or with your attorney.

  7. When you complete and notarize your will, please send an email to notify The Hearts Center at legal@heartscenter.org and attach of the copy of the will, or at least the parts(s) pertaining to The Hearts Center. Include the name and contact information of the executor of your will. This e-mail is confidential, and is only accessible by three council members on the finance committee. Also make sure your will is notarized even if your state or country does not require notarization.

Changes within your immediate family, such as divorce, separation, or the death of loved ones, especially those named in your will as beneficiaries, indicate important times to consider making changes to your will, living will and/or trust.
Circumstances that make it vital to update your will:

  • You desire to name a different executor, trustee or guardian.
  • Your assets have significantly increased or decreased in value.
  • You've moved to another state.
  • Your situation or a beneficiary's situation has changed.
  • The estate tax laws have changed. Check with your estate planning attorney to make sure your estate plan is up-to-date with any substantial federal and state estate tax law changes.

How to Update Your Will
  1. Get a copy of your current will.
  2. Mark the areas you'd like to change.
  3. Meet with your estate planning attorney to draft and prepare your new document.
  4. Consider discussing changes with us if they may affect The Hearts Center.

Contact your estate planning attorney if you have additional questions on updating your will.
For more information, see What if I change my mind? under Frequently Asked Questions.

To make a charitable bequest, or gift, to your charity of choice, you require a current will or revocable living trust. Creating your will can be made easier with professional consultation. And for your convenience, below is suggested wording for your bequest:

Creating your will can be made easier with professional consultation. And for your convenience, below is suggested wording for your bequest:

I give ___________a (restricted, unrestricted or endowed) (residue, percentage, or specific amount) to The Hearts Center Inc., having its principle office at 130 N. 2nd Street, Livingston, MT, for the general purpose of sharing the ascended masters' love-wisdom teachings throughout the Earth.

You can structure the charitable bequest or bequests to leave a specific item, securities, property or an amount of money to your charity of choice. You can make the gift contingent on certain events or leave a percentage of your estate to The Hearts Center.

When you complete your will

When you complete your will, if you have included The Hearts Center in your will, please notify The Hearts Center by sending an email to legal@heartscenter.org and attach the entire will, especially the notarized signature page, or at least a copy of the section of the will pertaining to The Hearts Center with the notarized signature page. Include the name and contact information of the executor of your will. This email is confidential, only accessed by three council members on the finance committee. Also make sure your will is notarized even if your state or country does not require notarization.

Printable version to take to with you.


Terms:
Residue - The balance remaining after bequests are distributed to your loved ones.
Percentage - When planning a future gift, it's sometimes difficult to determine what size donation will make sense. Emergencies happen. Make certain your family is financially taken care of first. Including a bequest of a percentage of your estate ensures that your gift will remain proportionate no matter how your estate's value fluctuates over the years.

Including a bequest of a percentage of your estate ensures that your gift will remain proportionate no matter how your estate's value fluctuates over the years.

COMPLETING YOUR TRUST AND/OR WILL

NOTE: Please seek advice from an attorney when completing your will.

Send your completion notice to The Hearts Center at legal@heartscenter.org as an attached copy of the section of your will pertaining to The Hearts Center.

Include the name and contact information of your executor. (This e-mail is confidential, only accessed by three council members on the finance committee.)

Inform your executors that at your transition they are to contact The Hearts Center at legal@heartscenter.org .

Notarize your will even if your state or country does not require it.

IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS

Probate is a court supervised process for administering and distributing a person's estate after their death. Having a will alone does not avoid the probate process. A will informs the world where you direct your property to go, and probate is required to carry out your wishes expressed in the will. Probate can be avoided several ways. Here are three major ways:

  • Leave no assets.
  • Co-title probatable assets with transfer on death (TOD) account(s) so that no probate is required. A transfer on death (TOD) account automatically transfers your assets to a named beneficiary when you pass on. With a TOD account, you can name one or multiple beneficiaries, such as another person and The Hearts Center, and divide your assets in any way that you would like. Check the laws in your state regarding TOD accounts.
  • Create a trust. A trust can avoid probate because once you have a trust, all of your assets are transferred to the trust during your lifetime. This avoids having the court transfer your assets after your passing. One of the primary benefits of having a trust is to avoid probate.
Here are four reasons you might choose to avoid having your estate pass through probate:
  • Lack of Privacy: Probate is public. As a court proceeding, the hearings and documents in probate are open to the public.
  • Numerous rules and procedures: Probate is a court supervised process. Court approval could be required at every step in the process, from appointing the initial personal representative for the estate, proving the will, confirming dispositions of property, approving the inventory and accounting of the estate, settling disputes between creditors or beneficiaries of the estate, and final distributions of the estate.
  • Delay: Probate involves time and delay in administering and distributing the estate. Even simple and uncontested probate proceedings can take many months to a year. If there are claims, disputes, or other complications in the proceedings, the process can take longer and all monies would be unavailable to the beneficiaries during this time.
  • Fees: Probates usually involve significant attorney’s fees. Although parties certainly have the option to represent themselves in probate, due to all the procedural requirements in probate, which is usually quite different from the procedures in a typical lawsuit, attorneys are usually recommended in all but the simplest of probate estates. Attorney’s fees are usually paid from the estate based on a percentage of the value of the estate. For example, in California, the fees to administer an estate with a single property valued at $300,000 would be approximately $9,000. If there are complications in the estate administration that requires extraordinary services, the fees would be even more.

Some probates are long and expensive; others can be easy. Both depend on the size and complexity of your estate. To be proactive, seek legal planning to avoid probate and protect your personal assets.

Please contact us for further details at legal@heartscenter.org.

A trust is a separate legal entity that a person sets up to manage his or her assets. Two types of trust are the living trust, also call a revocable trust, and an irrevocable trust. In a living trust, the terms can be changed at any time while you are living. In an irrevocable trust, the terms cannot be modified after it is created without the consent of the beneficiaries.

Trusts are set up during a person's lifetime to assure that assets are used in a way in which the person setting up the trust deems appropriate. Once assets are placed inside a trust, a third party, known as a trustee, manages them. In a living trust, you can be your own trustee while you are living.

The trustee determines how the assets are invested and to whom they are distributed when the owner of the trust dies, though a trustee must manage the trust in accordance with the guidelines laid out when the trust was formed. It is common for a wealthy person to use a trust as opposed to a will for estate planning and for stipulating what happens to his wealth upon his/her death.

Trusts could reduce tax burdens and avoid assets going to probate.

Maybe.

One difference between a will and a trust is when they start. A will safeguards your wishes and becomes active after you die. A trust, whether a living revocable or irrevocable trust, becomes effective immediately. Depending on your circumstances, both a will and a trust might be recommended.

In your will, you can designate who will receive your personal items and treasures, how your minor children will be cared for, and how your funeral wishes will be handled. A will is essential for everyone. Please see Ten Reasons to have a Will.

With your trust, you can protect your assets from probate and certain taxes. You would transfer your house and/or other real property, savings, IRA, stocks, cash and/or retirement account(s) and other assets into the trust to avoid probate on those assets. Trusts are not usually cost effective until your estate worth much more than $100,000 or other circumstances exist. It is much more likely for the average person to have a will than a trust. Trusts are much more expensive and usually require an attorney to draft.

See How to gain tax benefits and avoid unnecessary taxes.

Yes. You can name The Hearts Center as the beneficiary of your life insurance. As the named beneficiary, The Hearts Center will receive the funds quickly and easily. Using a life insurance policy is an ideal way to leave a financial legacy to ensure that The Hears Center work continues.

Here is how to name The Hears Center as the beneficiary of your life insurance:

Step 1: Beneficiary Designation Form
Contact your insurance company for the proper beneficiary form.

Step 2: Specify “The Hearts Center Inc.”
Clearly state the official name “The Hearts Center Inc.” on your Life Insurance beneficiary designation form, and add this address: 130 N. 2nd Street, Livingston, MT, 59047.

Step 3: Specify Percentage
Specify whether “The Hearts Center Inc.” is to receive all of your life insurance assets (100%) or a certain percentage. Beneficiary designation forms allow you to apportion your life insurance assets among different beneficiaries, if you so desire.

Step 4: Refer to your Life Insurance in your Will and/or Trust
Include a reference to your Life Insurance beneficiary decision in your will or trust documents. While a beneficiary designation takes precedence over any other estate documents, referring to your choice of beneficiary in your will or trust can eliminate any chance of misinterpretation regarding your intentions for your assets.

Step 5: Tell your Lawyer and/or Heirs
Make sure your lawyer and heirs know that your Life Insurance policy exists and how to contact the insurance company. Someone is required to send the life insurance company your death certificate to start the claims process.

Contingent Beneficiary
A contingent beneficiary receives your life insurance death benefit if your primary beneficiary dies. Naming a contingent beneficiary keeps the benefit out of probate court.

If, for example, your primary beneficiary is your spouse and you have no children or other heirs, you can name The Hearts Center as your contingent beneficiary in case your spouse dies with or before you.

Without a contingent beneficiary, your insurance payout goes through probate and may be subject to estate taxes or debt collection. The type of policy

There are certain policies that lend themselves better to charitable giving.

Permanent policies
Permanent policies such as whole life or universal life are ongoing and do not expire as long as the premiums are paid. These types of policies ensure that The Hearts Center receives your gift.

Term Life
A term life policy may not be the ideal choice because it can potentially expire before you die.

Rider
Some life insurance companies provide the option of adding a charitable-giving life insurance rider. This rider can be attached to policies with high face values typically allowing up to 1-2 percent of the policy's final payout to go directly to the organization of your choice such as The Hearts Center.

Tax deductions
The tax-deductible benefit for leaving your life insurance to a charity is equal to the policy's cash value, plus any premiums paid on the policy after the gift is made. To take advantage of the income tax benefit, you would name The Hearts Center as both the owner and the beneficiary.

Yes, you can gift your 401(k) to The Hearts Center upon your passing. Follow the five (5) simple steps listed below to name The Hearts Center as your beneficiary.

For estate planning purposes, leaving your 401(k) to a non-profit organization such as The Hearts Center is easy and also saves taxes. When you designate The Hearts Center as your beneficiary, your 401(k) assets pass tax-free whereas those assets would be taxable if they passed to your estate or to your heirs. Making The Hearts Center your 401(k) beneficiary allows you to donate more of your assets.

Here is how to gift your 401K:

Step 1: Beneficiary Designation Form
Contact your employer’s human resources department for the proper beneficiary forms. A 401(k) is a company-sponsored retirement plan, so your company's human resources department should have the forms you need to designate your beneficiary. If you have your own self-employed 401(k) plan, the firm that has custody of your plan assets should have beneficiary designation forms.

Step 2: Consent of Your Spouse
Get the consent of your spouse in writing. Federal law prohibits you from naming anyone but your spouse as the primary beneficiary of your 401(k) unless your spouse agrees and signs a waiver. Failure to obtain this written permission could block your intentions to leave your 401(k) to a charity. Therefore, if your spouse signs a waiver, you can designate anyone that you choose as your 401(k) beneficiary.

Step 3: Specify “The Hearts Center Inc.”
Clearly define the name “The Hearts Center Inc. at 130 N. 2nd Street, Livingston, MT, 59047” on your beneficiary designation forms. While passing your 401(k) assets to a charity is a straightforward process, you must use the full and correct name of “The Hearts Center Inc.” as your charity, or your transfer may not go as planned. In the case of any ambiguity, your 401(k) assets will be distributed to your estate.

Step 4: Specify the Percentage
Specify whether “The Hearts Center Inc.” is to receive all of your 401(k) assets (100%) or a certain percentage. Beneficiary designation forms allow you to apportion your 401(k) assets among different beneficiaries, if you so desire.

Step 5: Refer to your 401K in your Will and/or Trust
Include a reference to your 401K beneficiary decision in your will or trust documents. While a beneficiary designation takes precedence over any other estate documents, referring to your choice of 401(k) beneficiary in your will or trust can eliminate any chance of misinterpretation regarding your intentions for your 401(k) assets.

Choosing the person to act as the executor of your will and/or the trustee of your trust is one of the most important parts of your planning. Choose a person who has your interests at heart, understands your wishes, and will act accordingly. The person you choose should be mature, levelheaded, and comfortable with candid conversations. This person will be handling your financial matters according to your written directives. Do not let your choice be influenced by feelings of guilt or obligation to anyone. Your executor and/or trustee does not have to be a family member. It may be helpful yet not necessary that the person lives in the same city or state as you do. 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Your planned giving to The Hearts Center is a way to invest your legacy in a cause dear to your heart that will continue to benefit, bless and make a difference in the lives of future generations of lightbearers. Your gift will help balance a portion of your karma now and after your transition, and fulfill your dharma and help accomplish our global mission.

An intentional will is your legacy, a statement to the universe, an affirmation of who you are as a supporter of the mission of the Universal Great White Brotherhood. Your will and/or trust can be an affirmation that the fruits of your labors upon Earth will be used to move forward the Brotherhood's plans through The Hearts Center dispensation.

El Morya has requested that we all put our affairs in order. Only God knows our time of transition or what life-threatening or debilitating situation could suddenly develop. He also recommended giving at least 10% of our assets to The Hearts Center or other cause for the light. And if we have no heirs, we can consider the blessings of giving magnanimously, even up to 100% of our assets in support of God’s work.

As long as you will 10% or more of whatever you have in writing, it will count toward the “Three Free Events” dispensation. You can claim your abundance now by completing your will. Your will can be your treasure map, an alchemy with El Morya. If you desire to leave a million dollars to The Hearts Center, put it in your will. Participate in God’s will through completing your will.

Some heartfriends have said, “I don't have anything of value that I can offer The Hearts Center.” Making such a statement limits your abundance. You have the assets of your causal body. You have clothes, possibly a vehicle and other household items that can be sold. You could receive an inheritance or income stream in the future. Understand that your word is of value.

Help balance a portion of your karma now and after your transition! Your planned giving to The Hearts Center places a seal on your life's dedication to God and assists El Morya in securing future dispensations for our Hearts Center.

Please contact us for further details at legal@heartscenter.org.

Yes! Within your will, you may opt to bequeath funds to a local Hearts Center group. El Morya encourages heartfriends to develop local Hearts Centers. If your local Hearts Center has received the IRS 501c3 tax-exempt status designation, then those donations will be tax-deductible for USA tax payers.

The Hearts Center understands that International heartfriends may feel hesitant to bequeath money to American organizations because those contributions are not necessarily credited or recognized within their own nation due to different legal structures of various countries. We are grateful for all contributions. As we know, there is a higher law--the Law of the One. What we give in sincerity to support God's work on Earth is always returned to us in some form of blessing in our lives.

With a will, you control who gets what. If you make your transition without a will, your assets will be distributed according to state law and your wishes may not be fulfilled. You may also benefit by adding another legal instrument called a living trust.

  1. With a will, you retain control. Otherwise your probate property (such as life insurance proceeds, retirement account funds, or property held in a trust) would pass to your next of kin. If you have no living relatives or next of kin, your assets will go to your state.
  2. With a will, you can designate who will act as executor (a personal representative appointed to make sure the desires expressed in your will are carried out) of your estate and specify that they serve without expensive bond insurance which a court might require otherwise if it is not specified. The cost of the bond would be subtracted from your assets.
  3. With a will, you can make sure your body is taken care of according to ascended master recommendations.
  4. With a will, you can make specific bequests of items of your property to specific individuals and organizations, including non-profit organizations such as The Hearts Center.
  5. With a will, you may be able to minimize the taxes on your estate. If your estate is subject to estate tax, your gift to The Hearts Center is entitled to an estate tax charitable deduction for the gift's full value.
  6. With a will, you can make special financial arrangements for your family members who are minors, disabled or unfamiliar with money management.
  7. With a will, you can name the guardians of your minor children in case of the death of you and your spouse.
  8. With a will that adds a trust, you can delay receipt of part or all of your property until the heir reaches a certain age.
  9. With a will, the transfer of titled property, such as real estate, is provided for so that the chain of title is not clouded.
  10. 10. With a notarized will, you can be assured that the court will carry out your most current wishes. In some states, you can make a will "self-proving." This may be important if the witnesses to the will are deceased or cannot be found at the time of probate. A notarized will avoids this challenge. See Do I have to get my will notarized?
  11. At the same time that you create your will, you may request your attorney prepare a living will and a medical power of attorney to govern your medical care should you be in a coma or otherwise unable to express your wishes.

    If your total assets are more than $1,000,000, you should see a specialist in probate law to discuss estate planning to reduce the tax bite on your estate. You might be advised to make a living trust which has advantages over a simple will. A small amount spent on estate planning can save your estate thousands of dollars in taxes.

If something changes in your life, please update your will or trust as soon as possible! Wills and trusts can be modified or cancelled at any time.

Having an updated will and/or trust means that your current intentions will be carried out. So, when change occurs in your life, remember to update your will and/or trust.

Yes. You may donate real property in two ways.

First, you may deed your real property to The Hearts Center in your will or trust. If you choose this option, please inform the Hearts Center of your intention now to discuss any pertinent details.

Life Estate
Second, you may deed your real property to The Hearts Center now while retaining the right to live in your house or use your farm property for the rest of your life. The legal name for this arrangement is a gift of remainder interest with a retained life estate, also called a Life Estate. A life estate is a form of joint ownership that allows one person to remain in a house during their lifetime and then, upon their passing, ownership and title pass to the “remainder” owner. You can designate The Hearts Center to be the remainder owner to avoid probate and to donate your property without giving up the ability to live in your home.

This means that you, as the donor, can retain your existing life style while taking advantage of the tax savings. You receive immediate tax benefits in the form of sizeable charitable deductions and can put the associated tax savings to work to build greater retirement income.

Please contact us for further details at legal@heartscenter.org.

A living will and a medical or health care power of attorney (POA) are two types of advance directives. Advance directives speak for you when you're not able to speak for yourself and go into effect only if you are unable to make medical decisions for yourself, as determined by your doctors. They are good for every adult to have, regardless of your age, because unexpected end-of-life situations can happen at any age. Your family and doctors will consult these directives if you are unable to make your own health care decisions, reducing confusion or disagreement during an already stressful situation. 

Living will
This written, legal document describes your preferences regarding medical and/or other health care treatments after a serious accident or illness. It spells out the types of medical treatments and life-sustaining measures you desire and don't desire, such as mechanical breathing (respiration and ventilation), tube feeding or resuscitation. In some states, living wills may be called health care declarations or health care directives. 

Medical or health care power of attorney (POA)
The medical POA is a legal document that designates an individual, referred to as your health care agent or proxy, to make medical decisions for you in the event that you are unable to do so. However, it is different from a power of attorney authorizing someone to make financial transactions for you. 

Why have both a living will and a medical POA?
A living will can't cover every possible situation. Therefore, you might also desire a medical POA to designate someone to be your health care agent. This person will be guided by your living will but has the authority to interpret your wishes in situations that aren't described in your living will. A medical POA also might be a good idea if your family is opposed to some of your wishes or is divided about them. 

Choosing a health care agent
Choosing a person to act as your health care agent is possibly the most important part of your planning. Choose a person to be your agent who has your interests at heart, understands your wishes, and will act accordingly. The person you choose should be mature, levelheaded, and comfortable with candid conversations. Do not let your choice be influenced by feelings of guilt or obligation to anyone. Your health care agent does not have to be a family member. You may desire your health care decision maker to be different from the person you choose to handle your financial matters. It may be helpful but not necessary that the person lives in the same city or state as you do. 

What treatments would you desire?
In determining your wishes, think about your values. Is being independent and self-sufficient important to you? What circumstances do you feel would make your life not worth living? Would you desire treatment to extend life in any situation? Would you choose treatment only if a cure were possible? Would you desire palliative care to ease pain and discomfort if you were terminally ill? Although you can't predict what medical situations will arise, be sure to discuss possible treatments. It may help to talk with your doctor about these, especially if you have questions. Possible treatments include:

  • Resuscitation restarts the heart when it has stopped beating (cardiac death). Determine if and when you would desire to be resuscitated by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or by a device that delivers an electric shock to stimulate the heart.
  •  
  • Mechanical ventilation takes over your breathing if you are unable to do so. Consider if, when, and for how long you would choose to be placed on a mechanical ventilator.  Nutritional and hydration assistance supplies the body with nutrients and fluids intravenously (IV) or via a tube in the stomach. Decide if, when, and for how long you would choose to be fed in this manner. 
  • Dialysis removes waste from your blood and manages fluid levels if your kidneys no longer function. Determine if, when, and for how long you would choose to receive this treatment.
  • Do not resuscitate order (DNR) is a request to not have cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if your heart stops or if you stop breathing. Advance directives do not have to include a DNR order, and you don't have to have an advance directive to have a DNR order. Your doctor can put a DNR order in your medical chart.
  •  

Fill out the forms for your state Your advance directives should be in writing. Each state has its own laws regarding advance directives. Although it isn't required, it may be helpful to consult an attorney about this process. State-specific forms are available from a variety of websites such as the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. Once you have filled out the forms, give copies to your doctor, your health care agent, and your family members. Keep another copy in a safe, accessible place. You might also wish to keep a card in your wallet that states you have a living will and where it can be found. 

Can I change my mind? Yes. You can change your mind about your advance directives at any time. As your health changes or your perspective on life changes, you might reconsider some of your advance directives. Read over your advance directives from time to time to see if instructions require revising. To revise your advance directives, follow the same steps you used to create them. Get new advance directive forms. Discuss your changes with your friends, family and doctor. Then distribute copies, requesting everyone destroy the earlier version. If there is not time to redo the paperwork, you can always cancel your advance directive by telling your doctor and your family.

Plan ahead! Share your wishes with your family. Injury, illness and death aren't easy subjects to talk about. And by planning ahead, you can ensure that you receive the type of medical care you desire. You also relieve your family of the burden of decision. Be sure to discuss your wishes with your loved ones. Let them know you are creating advance directives, and explain your feelings about medical care and your desires in specific instances.  Review your advance directives from time to time.

Remember, a living will or medical POA goes into effect only if you are unable to make medical decisions for yourself, as determined by your doctors.

Please contact us for further details at legal@heartscenter.org.

A power of attorney (POA) or letter of attorney is a written authorization for someone to represent or act on another's behalf in private affairs, business, or some other legal matter. The person authorizing the other to act is the principal, grantor, or donor (of the power). The one authorized to act is called the agent, attorney or the attorney-in-fact.

A power of attorney can be a powerful document. Choosing the correct person(s) is an important decision! Here are eight (8) important considerations. 

  1. The power of a POA. In a power of attorney, you name someone as your attorney-in-fact (or agent) to make financial decisions for you. The power gives your agent control over any assets held in your name alone. If a bank account is owned in your name alone, your attorney-in-fact will have access to it. If you have transferred an asset to your trust, your trustee will have control of the asset.
  2. Two options. There are two types of powers of attorney. A durable power of attorney is effective when you sign it and survives your incapacity. A springing power of attorney springs into effect when you are incapacitated. A springing power of attorney may seem more attractive and it is actually harder to use. Your agent will have to convince the bank that you are incapacitated and, even though the document spells out how to do that, your local bank branch often does not desire to make that determination. Therefore, your lawyer could be required to get involved. For that reason, most attorneys advise you to execute a durable power of attorney. The attorney will often hold the original power of attorney until it is needed as an extra protection.  
  3. Choose wisely. Choose a person whom you trust who will fulfill the fiduciary duty to use the assets only for your benefit or as you direct in the document. A dishonest agent has the authority to misuse your money because he/she has full access to your financial accounts. See Choosing a health care agent.
  4. The power of two. Consider naming two agents to act together if your state allows for it. While having two people serve can be cumbersome, this can substantially reduce your risk and ensure your assets go to the people and organizations you’ve designated in your will. 
  5. Name an alternate. An Alternate POA can act if your named agent dies before you or is incapacitated. Also, consider nominating a guardian and conservator in your power of attorney in case one is required in the future. 
  6. Before you sign - Read the document. Review the powers listed in the POA document. Discuss different situations with your attorney, such as if your agent could amend a revocable trust that you created during your lifetime. This is usually not a wise plan.
  7. Power of attorney ends with you. Once you pass away, the document is no longer valid and your will then controls what happens to your assets.  
  8. Fund your revocable trust. If you fund your revocable trust during your lifetime, you may not have the requirement or opportunity to use your power of attorney, and you may desire to still have one just in case.  

e-mail legal@heartscenter.org
or call 406-333-8804 with additional questions.

The Importance of a Will - A Spiritual Perspective

El Morya on Wills - September 27, 2011

El Morya recommends that those who are active in these teachings put in their wills their desire to give 10% of whatever assets they have at the point of transition to our Hearts Center movement.

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 Listen:  Discourse on the Meaning and Importance of Sacrificial Giving

February 21, 2012

Contributing to God’s Work through Your Will
The Keeper of the Scrolls - October 25, 2011

Bequeathing to The Hearts Center helps balance karma; a commentary on the experiences of three lifestreams.

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Create Your Will Now!

Now is the best time to create your will and trust. This decision will provide comfort for you and clarity to your heirs regarding your intentions. It will secure and protect the future of your children, your spouse, and/or other loved ones whom you name as heirs to your estate. Will and trust planning ensures your assets are distributed according to your wishes to benefit the people and charities you intend.

Avoid the sorrow to those close to you of their having to witness decisions regarding the dispersal of your property and possessions done by the state. In your will you can appoint those you trust to manage your affairs and assets.

Give Magnanimously!

No matter what your age, health or financial status, consider writing your last will and testament or creating a revocable trust. Also consider writing a living will which includes directives concerning your intentions regarding life-prolonging medical practices. And as you decide upon family and friend beneficiaries, consider including The Hearts Center in your will. 

El Morya has requested that we all put our affairs in order. Only God knows our time of transition or what life-threatening or debilitating situation could suddenly develop. He also recommended giving at least 10% of our assets to The Hearts Center or other cause for the light. And if we have no heirs, we can consider the blessings of giving magnanimously, even up to 100% of our assets in  support of God’s work.

Everyone Has Assets

Some heartfriends have said, “I don't have anything of value that I can offer The Hearts Center.” Making such a statement limits your abundance. You have the assets of your causal body. You have clothes, possibly a vehicle and other household items that can be sold. You could receive an inheritance or income stream in the future. Understand that your word is of value.

As long as you will 10% or more of whatever you have in writing, it will count toward the dispensation. You can claim your abundance now by completing your will. Your will can be your treasure map, an alchemy with El Morya. If you desire to leave a million dollars to The Hearts Center, put it in your will. Participate in God’s will through completing your will.

Your Legacy of Light Is a Statement to the Universe

An important reason for having an intentional will is that your legacy is a statement to the universe. It is an affirmation of who you are as a supporter of the mission of the Universal Great White Brotherhood. It is an affirmation that the fruits of your labors upon Earth will be used to move forward the Brotherhood's plans through our dispensation.