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Look for the Star Aldebaran
Last Post 17 Aug 2011 06:18 PM by Dean Baylor. 11 Replies.
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Sun DiscUser is Offline
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01 Dec 2010 10:27 PM  
ALDEBARAN, "the follower," considered by some as the "most beautiful star" in the heavens.

Look for the star Aldebaran, using the sky maps provided by POPULAR ASTRONOMY.
Dean BaylorUser is Offline
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01 Dec 2010 11:16 PM  
Aldebaran is the bright white star in this image, representing one of the eyes of the bull in the constellation of Taurus.

Aldebaran was the most important star in the heavens to ancient astrologers because of its location in the very middle (15 degrees, 0 minutes, 0 seconds of arc) of the constellation of Taurus.

Aldebaran is traditionally seen as the lower eye of the "bull" and as a consequence was identified by the Arabs, Greeks and Romans as the "Bulls Eye," a phrase which has survived to the present day to describe the center of a target.

It was from this central position of Aldebaran that all other celestial longitudes were calculated, so much so that the Romans referred to it as "Stella Dominatrix," the "Master Star."

Aldebaran was, therefore, one of the four "royal stars" of ancient Persia along with Regulus, Antares and Fomalhaut.

Ancient astrologers also used the star Antares for locating longitudes, as it was located almost exactly 180 degrees from Aldebaran on the opposite side of the zodiac in the "heart of the Scorpion," at 15 degrees and 0 minutes of Scorpio. These were the two great "fiducial" stars of antiquity.

Note: In reality, there is really no such thing as a "fixed star," as these bodies of light are moving at incredible speed. It is only when viewed from our perspective on earth that they appear to be standing still. For example,
it will take the star Aldebaran approximately 90,000 years for it to move one degree in its proper motion as viewed from the earth.
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02 Dec 2010 04:35 AM  
'Found it easily on Stellarium.It was 7" E of Sirius. I did not Identify it with the 'bullseye' of Taurus constellation.
Dean that is a great description you have there
constance welzel
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02 Dec 2010 04:39 AM  

Posted By constance welzel on 01 Dec 2010 09:35 PM
'Found it easily on Stellarium.It was 7" E of Sirius. I did not Identify it with the 'bullseye' of Taurus constellation.
Dean that is a great description you have there

By the way ,wasn't that the name of the planet/star that was blown out of existence in "Star Wars" by the Dark forces?
constance welzel
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02 Dec 2010 11:25 PM  
I love that star and it sent it´s love back to me. Sounds silly? But in fact always when it is a clear night sky with all those wonderful stars I simply must look up Orion and in that way locate Taurus with the orange shining Aldebaran and I am always filled with love and joy after doing that, so often that is the last thing I do before I retire at night. Ever since childhood, looking and communicating with the stars has always given me a sense of protection and peace, and a kind of harmonious joy.
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02 Dec 2010 11:27 PM  
and also insight and inspiration. I love it!
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04 Dec 2010 05:42 PM  
Thank you Marita, for your testimony of the starry bodies of those wonderful Lives. Star gazing, for me, is an inspiring practice and has become more and more of a spiritual workout. I see the beings behind the 12 constellations, and other stars, especially, as my trainers, who put me through a type of circuit training, month by month, or day by day, or hour by hour, as the case is. And I see our sun as my primary trainer. It is a wonderful feeling to know that, all the time, we are surrounded by such masterful and humble stellar beings.

Raphael
Dean BaylorUser is Offline
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12 Dec 2010 09:39 PM  
Yes, Constance, I too remembered the planet in the Star Wars episode which was destroyed by the "death star" having a similar sounding name to the star Aldebaran, so I looked it up and the fictional planet in the movie was spelled ALDERAAN. One suspects somebody may have had Aldebaran in mind when they invented this name.

The fictional planet Alderaan (from Star Wars)

In Star Wars lore, Alderaan was the home planet of Princess Leia.
Dean BaylorUser is Offline
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12 Dec 2010 10:45 PM  
Marita,

The star Aldebaran is about 65 light years from the earth, which means that the light we see in the night sky left Aldebaran 65 years ago, and yet I believe you when you say you felt Aldebaran send its love back to you moments after you had sent forth your own feelings of love. This means you have used your own experiment to prove the existence of warp speed !!!
Ha, Ha, Ha !!!

Truly, God's awareness of everything is instantaneous.

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05 Jan 2011 11:45 PM  
The starry body Aldebaran looks like the fabled star of
Bethlehem. Are they one and the same?
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07 Jan 2011 11:00 PM  
Ha, ha, ha, Dean. I just read your input. Well, beyond time and space....or in the sky, maybe there is a cosmic Post(man)Master who are saying when receiving the mail (my love) -"the receiver unknown or have moved, return to sender"
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17 Aug 2011 06:18 PM  
That is a good question, John.

As bright as Aldebaran is, its appearance is relatively constant to observers on earth. This means it would have appeared as it always has and would not have triggered any extra notice from people.

The great astronomer and astrologer Johannes Kepler theorized in 1614 that the "Star of Bethlehem" may have been the conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in 7 BC. We now know that this conjunction was never within 1 degree of being exact, so it would not have garnered any extra notice either. An ancient Babylonian manuscript from this time period makes no mention of the conjunction being extra special in any way.

Chinese and Korean astrologers observed a comet in 5 BC, so perhaps it may have been a comet, although the astrologers of the day considered comets to be a bad omen (the harbingers of returning karma)?

Others have surmised that maybe some ancient star went supernova and exploded during this period, presenting observers on earth with a brilliant night sky for a period of time.

Maybe this is a Darshan question?


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